Source Problems on the French Revolution

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5. Procédure Criminelle, Suite, No. CCCLXXIII, 28.

j. Felix Alandre Gallemand, twenty years of age, secretary in the committee of the constitution of the national assembly, living in Paris, Place Vendôme, No. 4, deposes that, about six o’clock [the morning of the sixth], he saw a very large troop of people of both sexes armed with pikes, cudgels, and other arms enter the court of the ministers by the iron gate, which was open according to custom, and advance as far as the iron gate of the royal court, which they refused to open for them. Then this troop divided into two bands; the one went to the court of the chapel, and the other to the court of the princes. This last one reached the royal court by the passage which connects it with that of the princes. It presented itself at the foot of the grand staircase, where entrance was refused by the Cent-Suisses, who were there on guard. A former French guard, having taken the post, let a very small number pass. During this time a body guard, who was on the balcony, was fired at by a Parisian national guard, who was alone among this troop of people armed with pikes and cudgels. The guard of the king was not struck by the shot, and replied to it by a pistol shot which blew out the brains of the national guard. Then the people with pikes rushed forward in a crowd and furiously mounted the staircase and threw themselves upon several guards of the king, who were overpowered. This same troop went immediately to the apartment of the queen, led by a man poorly dressed. The guard of the king, who was on duty at the door of this apartment, was killed while defending the entrance, but yet he had time to cry through the keyhole, "Save the queen!" One of his comrades came to take his place, to defend the entrance to the apartment. He got a blow on the head from the butt of a musket, given him by a soldier of the guard of Versailles, who, he had since been told, was a carpenter employed by the royal government. This man, believing the body guard to be dead, took his tyro watches and money away from him, and left him and entered the apartment of the queen, with others of the pikemen in large numbers. [July 3, 1790.]

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Chicago: "5. Procédure Criminelle, Suite, No. CCCLXXIII, 28," Source Problems on the French Revolution in Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913), 227–229. Original Sources, accessed April 13, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PNPNNXQUVWUIT8E.

MLA: . "5. Procédure Criminelle, Suite, No. CCCLXXIII, 28." Source Problems on the French Revolution, in Source Problems on the French Revolution, edited by Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling, New York, Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913, pp. 227–229. Original Sources. 13 Apr. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PNPNNXQUVWUIT8E.

Harvard: , '5. Procédure Criminelle, Suite, No. CCCLXXIII, 28' in Source Problems on the French Revolution. cited in 1913, Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. , Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, pp.227–229. Original Sources, retrieved 13 April 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PNPNNXQUVWUIT8E.