Source Problems on the French Revolution

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5. Procès-Verbal, No. 5.

CONTINUATION OF THE MINUTES OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Tuesday, June 23, 1789, eleven A.M.

The session held in the presence of the king, the clergy, and the nobility being united in the national hall.

The king having entered, delivered a discourse announcing the object of the session. He then had read by one of the secretaries of state a declaration, containing various provisions, in fifteen articles, given at Versailles, the 23d of June.

After the reading of this declaration the king delivered a second discourse, which was followed by the reading, by one of the secretaries of state, of a second declaration, announced as the "Declaration of the Wishes of the King." It contained thirty-five articles, and was likewise given at Versailles, the 23d of June.

The king delivered a third discourse and retired.

A short time after the withdrawal of the king, a part of the clergy and nobility having retired, the grand master of ceremonies approached the president and told him that he had heard the order of the king to retire. The president replied to him that he could not separate the assembly, as it had not deliberated freely upon the subject. The grand master of ceremonies said that he was going to give an account of this reply to the king.

The assembly, deliberating after the royal session, passed the following resolutions:

"The national assembly unanimously declares its intention to persist in its preceding resolutions."

"The national assembly declares that the person of each of the deputies is inviolable; that all individuals, all corporations, tribunal, court, or commission that shall dare, during or after the present session, to pursue, to seek for, to arrest or have arrested, detain or have detained, a deputy, by reason of any propositions, advice, opinions, or discourse made by him in the states general; as well as all persons who shall lend their aid to any of the said attempts, by whomsoever they may be ordered, are infamous and traitors to the nation, and guilty of capital crime. The national assembly decrees that in the aforesaid cases it will take all the necessary measures to have sought out, pursued, and punished those who may be its authors, instigators, or executors."

Moreover, the assembly adjourned the session until to-morrow at nine o’clock.

These resolutions were passed in the presence of several of the clergy. Those whose credentials were verified gave their votes and their opinions; and the others asked that mention be made of their presence.

Bailly, President; Camus, Secretary; Pison du Galland, Jr., Secretary.

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Chicago: "5. Procès-Verbal , No. 5," Source Problems on the French Revolution in Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913), 96–98. Original Sources, accessed February 21, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=YWKZYWICBHGXIYT.

MLA: . "5. Procès-Verbal , No. 5." Source Problems on the French Revolution, in Source Problems on the French Revolution, edited by Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling, New York, Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913, pp. 96–98. Original Sources. 21 Feb. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=YWKZYWICBHGXIYT.

Harvard: , '5. Procès-Verbal , No. 5' in Source Problems on the French Revolution. cited in 1913, Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. , Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, pp.96–98. Original Sources, retrieved 21 February 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=YWKZYWICBHGXIYT.