Source Problems on the French Revolution

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13. Jallet, Journal, 96, 100.

Two councils were held, one Saturday night, and the other the next day.... The king had ordered the assembly to separate. The third estate and a great part of the clergy, who were for the union, remained. There was profound silence for several minutes. The Marquis de Brézé entered by the order of the king and declared by order of the president that it was the wish of his majesty that they should separate. The president replied that the session could be suspended only by the consent of the national assembly. One of the deputies arose and said: "Only bayonets can make us leave here." The Marquis de Brézé withdrew to report to the king what had happened. His majesty had given orders to the body guard, which had been summoned from Saint-Germain, to return there. The ministers, frightened, made them come back. The king, astonished at this movement, reiterated his orders. It is said that the king, having learned that the third estate and part of the clergy did not wish to separate, in spite of his orders, replied: "Well, d— it, let them remain...." Eighty curés remained, in spite of the orders of the king. The Archbishop of Vienna was weak enough to send word to the curés to come to him. Some of them went out, but, not getting any good reasons from the archbishop for this action, wished to return; the guards prevented them from doing so. The other curés were present at the whole session. The procès-verbal of the national session stated that the action was taken by the three orders united. In fact, the majority of the clergy was looked upon as being present, because of the union of the preceding day, and the deputies of the Dauphiné and of Saint-Domingo were present as representatives of the nobility.

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Chicago: "13. Jallet, Journal, 96, 100," Source Problems on the French Revolution in Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913), 148–149. Original Sources, accessed February 21, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Y43GM5RD66D9CS8.

MLA: . "13. Jallet, Journal, 96, 100." Source Problems on the French Revolution, in Source Problems on the French Revolution, edited by Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling, New York, Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913, pp. 148–149. Original Sources. 21 Feb. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Y43GM5RD66D9CS8.

Harvard: , '13. Jallet, Journal, 96, 100' in Source Problems on the French Revolution. cited in 1913, Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. , Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, pp.148–149. Original Sources, retrieved 21 February 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Y43GM5RD66D9CS8.