A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Manhattan Project

Manhattan Project On 2 October 1939, Albert Einstein wrote a letter alerting Franklin D. Roosevelt to the possibility of Germany developing atomic weapons and stressing the need for US research to counter this threat. This warning led the US to award grants for atomic research at leading universities—the first major federal sponsorship of scientific work—and then to the founding in May 1943 of the Manhattan Project to build an atomic bomb. Under Robert Oppenheimer, who was assisted by Enrico Fermi, the project detonated its first atomic bomb at Alamogordo, N.Mex., on 16 July 1945. It produced just two other bombs before Japan surrendered, which were used at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Manhattan Project," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed September 24, 2021, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IRI6KYEDNQ556SM.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Manhattan Project." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 24 Sep. 2021. originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IRI6KYEDNQ556SM.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Manhattan Project' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 24 September 2021, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IRI6KYEDNQ556SM.