Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England

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Correspondence of George the Third with Lord North from 1768 to 1783, Vol. I, pp. 2–227; ed. by W. B. Downe. World History

386.

Extracts from the Letters of George III to Lord North (1768–1783)

Lord North:

Though entirely confiding in your attachment to my person, as well as in your hatred of every lawless proceeding, yet I think it highly proper to apprize you that the expulsion of Mr. Wilkes appears to be very essential, and must be effected; and that I make no doubt, when you lay this affair with your usual precision before the meeting of the gentlemen of the House of Commons this evening, it will meet with the required unanimity and vigour. . . .

April 25, 1768

If there is any man capable of forgetting his criminal writings, I think his speech in the Court of King’s Bench, on Wednesday last, reason enough for to go as far as possible to expel him; for he declared "Number 45" a paper that the author ought to glory in.

Lord North:

November 18, 1774, 48 min. p’t M.

I am not sorry that the line of conduct seems now chalked out, which the enclosed dispatches thoroughly justify; the New England governments are in a state of rebellion; blows must decide whether they are to be subject to this country or independent.

Lord North:

February 8, 1775, 50 min. p’t 11 A.M.

The proposed answer to the address is highly proper, as it conveys the sentiments that must be harboured by every candid and rational mind. This language ought to open the eyes of the deluded Americans; but, if it does not, it must set every delicate man at liberty to avow the propriety of the most coercive measures.

November 4, 1776

I trust the rebel army will soon be dispersed.

February 24, 1777

The accounts from America are most comfortable. The surprise and want of spirit of the Hessian officers as well as soldiers at Trenton is not much to their credit, and will undoubtedly elate the rebels who, till then, were in a state of the greatest despondency. I wish Sir W. Howe had placed none but British troops in the outposts; but I am certain, by a letter I have seen from Lord Cornwallis, that the rebels will soon have sufficient reason to fall into the former dejection.

March 6, 1778

The intelligence from Mr. Thornton of the discontents among the leaders in America, if authentick, will not only greatly facilitate the bringing back that deluded country to some reasonable ideas, but will make France reconsider whether she ought to enter into a war when America may leave her in the lurch.

March 26, 1778

You cannot be surprised that the degree to which you have pressed to resign during the space of the last three months has given me much uneasiness, but it has never made me harbour any thought to the disadvantage of your worth.

March 8, 1781

I am not surprised Lord North feels disgusted at the fatigue he undergoes: he may be certain I feel my task as unpleasant as he can possibly find his, but both of us are in trammels, and it is our duty to continue.

January 21, 1782

On one material point I shall ever coincide with Lord G. Germain, that is, against a separation from America, and that I shall never lose an opportunity of declaring that no consideration shall ever make me in the smallest degree an instrument in a measure that I am confident would annihilate the rank in which this British Empire stands among the European states, and would render my situation in this country below continuing an object to me.

February 28, 1782

Lord North cannot be disappointed at my being much hurt at the success of Mr. Conway’s motion, though in some degree prepared by what he said yesterday.

March 9, 1782

Lord North may easily conceive that I am much hurt at the appearance of yesterday in the House of Commons, and at his opinion that it is totally impossible for the present ministry to continue to conduct public business any longer.

Lord North:

March 19, 1782

After having yesterday in the most solemn manner assured you that my sentiments of honour will not permit me to send for any of the leaders of opposition and personally treat with them, I could not but be hurt at your letter of last night. Every man must be the sole judge of his feelings; therefore whatever you or any man can say on that subject has no avail with me.

Lord North:

March 20, 1782

At last the fatal day has come which the misfortunes of the time and the sudden change of sentiments of the House of Commons have drove me to, of changing the ministry. . . . I ever did and ever shall look on you as a friend as well as a faithful servant. . . .

G. R.

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Chicago: "Extracts from the Letters of George III to Lord North (1768– 1783)," Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, ed. Edward Potts Cheyney (1861-1947) (Boston: Ginn, 1935, 1922), 633–636. Original Sources, accessed June 19, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=F61R3SQY9M8J5IM.

MLA: . "Extracts from the Letters of George III to Lord North (1768– 1783)." Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, edited by Edward Potts Cheyney (1861-1947), Boston, Ginn, 1935, 1922, pp. 633–636. Original Sources. 19 Jun. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=F61R3SQY9M8J5IM.

Harvard: , 'Extracts from the Letters of George III to Lord North (1768– 1783)' in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England. cited in 1922, Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, ed. , Ginn, 1935, Boston, pp.633–636. Original Sources, retrieved 19 June 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=F61R3SQY9M8J5IM.