The Veddas

Contents:

Show Summary

Second marriages are . . . frequent, a man often marrying a sister of his deceased wife and a woman marrying one of her dead husband’s brothers. We believe that such unions were regarded as both a privilege and a duty, though according to Handuna of Sitala Wanniya a man married his dead wife’s sister principally because if he married anyone else his children would not be looked after so well. If a widow does not marry one of her dead husband’s brothers she may return to her parents, though it seemed that if these were no longer living she would generally stay with her late husband’s group, whose duty it would then be to look after her and her children.2

2Seligman, C.G.n/an/an/an/a and B.Z.n/an/an/an/an/a, , 68 (Cambridge University Press. By permission).

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: The Veddas

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: The Veddas

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: "The Veddas," The Veddas in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. Thomas, William I. (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937), Original Sources, accessed July 22, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=UUV41TYDUI5H283.

MLA: . "The Veddas." The Veddas, in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, edited by Thomas, William I., New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937, Original Sources. 22 Jul. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=UUV41TYDUI5H283.

Harvard: , 'The Veddas' in The Veddas. cited in 1937, Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. , McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York. Original Sources, retrieved 22 July 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=UUV41TYDUI5H283.