Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England

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Parliamentary History, Vol. XX, p. 248. World History

303.

Extracts from the Instrument of Government

The government of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and the dominions thereunto belonging.

I. That the supreme legislative authority of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and the dominions thereunto belonging shall be and reside in one person and the people assembled in parliament; the style of which person shall be the Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

II. That the exercise of the chief magistracy, and the administration of the government over the said countries and dominions and the people thereof shall be in the Lord Protector, assisted with a council, the number whereof shall not exceed twenty-one nor be less than thirteen. . . .

V. That the Lord Protector, by the advice aforesaid, shall direct all things concerning the keeping and holding of a good correspondency with foreign kings, princes, and states; and also, with the consent of the major part of the council, have the power of war and peace. . . .

A parliament every three years

VII. That there shall be a parliament summoned to meet at Westminster upon the third day of September, 1654, and that successively a parliament shall be summoned once in every third year, to be accounted from the dissolution of the present parliament.

VIII. That neither the parliament to be next summoned, nor any successive parliaments, shall, during the time of five months, to be accounted from the day of their first meeting, be adjourned, prorogued, or dissolved, without their own consent. . . .

XXIV. That all bills agreed upon by the parliament shall be presented to the Lord Protector for his consent; and in case he shall not give his consent thereto within twenty days after they shall be presented to him, or give satisfaction to the parliament within the time limited, that then, upon declaration of the parliament that the Lord Protector hath not consented nor given satisfaction, such bills shall pass into and become laws, although he shall not give his consent thereunto; provided such bills contain nothing in them contrary to the matters contained in these presents. . . .

Cromwell to be Protector for life

XXXIII. That Oliver Cromwell, Captain General of the forces of England, Scotland, and Ireland, shall be, and is hereby declared to be, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and the dominions thereunto belonging, for his life. . . .

Freedom of religion to all Christians except Roman Catholics and Episcopalians

XXXVII. That such as profess faith in God by Jesus Christ, though differing in judgment from the doctrine, worship, or discipline publicly held forth, shall not be restrained from, but shall be protected in the profession of the faith and exercise of their religion; so as they abuse not this liberty to the civil injury of others and to the actual disturbance of the public peace on their parts; provided this liberty be not extended to Popery or Prelacy, nor to such as, under the profession of Christ, hold forth and practice licentiousness.

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Chicago: "Extracts from the Instrument of Government," Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, ed. Edward Potts Cheyney (1861-1947) (Boston: Ginn, 1935, 1922), 495–497. Original Sources, accessed December 6, 2022, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KI658MUSWM7TH5U.

MLA: . "Extracts from the Instrument of Government." Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, edited by Edward Potts Cheyney (1861-1947), Boston, Ginn, 1935, 1922, pp. 495–497. Original Sources. 6 Dec. 2022. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KI658MUSWM7TH5U.

Harvard: , 'Extracts from the Instrument of Government' in Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England. cited in 1922, Readings in English History Drawn from the Original Sources: Intended to Illustrate a Short History of England, ed. , Ginn, 1935, Boston, pp.495–497. Original Sources, retrieved 6 December 2022, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KI658MUSWM7TH5U.