The Baganda


Show Summary

the birth of twins was regarded as a most important event, for they were regarded as due to the direct intervention of the god Mukasa, and this necessitated great care and numbers of tabus, in order to retain the favor of the god. Any mistake on the part of the parents, or any sickness which befell the twins, was looked upon as the result of the god’s anger, which might extend to the whole clan.2

2Roscoe, J.n/an/an/an/an/a, , 64–65 (The Macmillan Company. By permission).

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: The Baganda

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: The Baganda

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: The Baganda in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. Thomas, William I. (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937), Original Sources, accessed July 21, 2024, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IEZQJE3JXY8BK4N.

MLA: . The Baganda, in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, edited by Thomas, William I., New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937, Original Sources. 21 Jul. 2024. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IEZQJE3JXY8BK4N.

Harvard: , The Baganda. cited in 1937, Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. , McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York. Original Sources, retrieved 21 July 2024, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=IEZQJE3JXY8BK4N.