A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Tubman, Harriet

Tubman, Harriet (b. Dorchester County, Md., ca. 1821; d. Auburn, N.Y., 10 March 1913) Born Araminta Ross, she escaped from slavery and earned the sobriquet “Moses,” as the underground railroad’s most renowned conductor, with a reward of $40,000 on her head. She made 19 trips to Md. and conveyed over 300 slaves north, including her parents, two children, and a sister. After the second Fugitive Slave Act (1850), she guided escapees all the way to Canada. After 1865, she founded the Harriet Tubman Home for Indigent and Aged Negroes.

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Underground Railroad

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Tubman, Harriet," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed December 1, 2022, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=EFRPXYT1G5WWG8K.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Tubman, Harriet." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 1 Dec. 2022. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=EFRPXYT1G5WWG8K.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Tubman, Harriet' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 1 December 2022, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=EFRPXYT1G5WWG8K.