Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society

Author: John Winslow  | Date: 1883

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Colonel Winslow 1883

"This Is the Forest Primeval . . ."

[1755]

[September 10, 1755]. I sent for Father Landrey, their principal speaker who talks English and told him the time was come for part of the inhabitants to embark and that the number concluded for this day was 250, and that we should begin with the young men, and desired he would inform his brethren of it. He was greatly surprised. I told him it must be done and that I should order the whole prisoners to be drawn up six deep, their young men on the left, and as the tide in a very little time favored my design, could not give them above an hour to prepare for going on board, and ordered our whole party to be under arms and post themselves between the two gates and the church in the rear of my quarters, which was obeyed, and, agreeable to my directions, the whole of the French inhabitants were drawn together in one body, their young men as directed on the left.

I then ordered Captain Adams with a lieutenant, eighty noncomissioned officers, and private men to draw off from the main body to guard the young men of the French amounting to 141 men to the transports and order the prisoners to march. They all answered they would not go without their fathers. I told them that was a word I did not understand, for that the King’s command was to be absolute and should be absolutely obeyed, and that I did not love to use harsh means, but that the time did not admit of parleys or delays; and then ordered the whole troops to fix their bayonets and advance towards the French, and bid the four right hand files of the prisoners, one of whom I took hold on (who opposed the marching) and bid:

"March!"

He obeyed and the rest followed, though slowly, and went off praying, singing and crying, being met by the women and children all the way (which is a mile and a half) with great lamentations upon their knees, praying, etc.

I then ordered the remaining French to choose out of 109 of their married men to follow their young people (the ice being broke). They readily complied and drew up in a body. Thus ended this troublesome job.

[October 8, 1755]. Began to embark the inhabitants who went off very solentarily [sic] and unwillingly, the women in great distress carrying off their children in their arms. Others carrying their decrepit parents in their carts and all their goods, moving in great confusion, and appeared a scene of woe and distress.

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Chicago: John Winslow, Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society, ed. Colonel Winslow in History in the First Person: Eyewitnesses of Great Events: They Saw It Happen, ed. Louis Leo Snyder and Richard B. Morris (Harrisburg, Pa.: Stackpole Co., 1951), Original Sources, accessed July 6, 2022, http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=6KKCE7512H53R98.

MLA: Winslow, John. Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society, edited by Colonel Winslow, in History in the First Person: Eyewitnesses of Great Events: They Saw It Happen, edited by Louis Leo Snyder and Richard B. Morris, Harrisburg, Pa., Stackpole Co., 1951, Original Sources. 6 Jul. 2022. http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=6KKCE7512H53R98.

Harvard: Winslow, J, Collections of the Nova Scotia Historical Society, ed. . cited in 1951, History in the First Person: Eyewitnesses of Great Events: They Saw It Happen, ed. , Stackpole Co., Harrisburg, Pa.. Original Sources, retrieved 6 July 2022, from http://originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=6KKCE7512H53R98.